If you could only go to one place for hiking/camping/fishing, where would it be? And what places with in the US are you still wanting to visit?

- Asked by lordineedasweetdistraction

2: I haven’t spent enough time in the Pacific North West, Oregon and Washington, so that covers a lot of ground for sure.

1: The Wind River Range in Wyoming is my favorite place in the world. Aside from a relatively short summer season, the place is amazing. Long approaches to big mountains, glaciers, jagged granite spires that have long classic moderate climbs on them. Plus there’s ample water everywhere that happens to have hungry brookies, cutthroat, rainbow, and golden trout (including the world record). The scenery is beyond compare, and it is a designated USFS Wilderness. No permits, no designated sites, and you can go days without seeing another person if you wish. Shhhh, don’t tell anybody I said that.

Hello?

Sitting around sending out emails to try and book some shows back east and deep south for December. Let’s talk. Tell me where an acoustic singer-songwriter might come play in your town… or ask me whatever!

Do it. 

Aspen Reflection.
I spent an hour or so wandering up this little meadow stream before dinner at camp. Each pocket of water held shy and very lovely trout. The meadow grasses were dry and turning toward brown. Grasshoppers fled in many directions as I pushed through the knee high grass toward a stand of Aspen trees.
I could see the red crowns of these trees from camp and wanted to try and capture their beauty, though I knew this to be unlikely. Images can’t capture how the moment is tied to the way I felt there in the cooling evening air, the waning sunlight, the smell of pine, the grasshoppers, those trout. 
Normally Aspen trees turn yellow in the fall, but this stand was a stately red and orange, pushed upward to height by the encroaching pine. This is how forests work. Aspen come first after fire to hold the earth together until pine can prosper and eventually take over. These stands of somewhat temporary trees are lovely reminders of my own temporal existence. I am here but for a season. What will I make of it?

Aspen Reflection.

I spent an hour or so wandering up this little meadow stream before dinner at camp. Each pocket of water held shy and very lovely trout. The meadow grasses were dry and turning toward brown. Grasshoppers fled in many directions as I pushed through the knee high grass toward a stand of Aspen trees.

I could see the red crowns of these trees from camp and wanted to try and capture their beauty, though I knew this to be unlikely. Images can’t capture how the moment is tied to the way I felt there in the cooling evening air, the waning sunlight, the smell of pine, the grasshoppers, those trout. 

Normally Aspen trees turn yellow in the fall, but this stand was a stately red and orange, pushed upward to height by the encroaching pine. This is how forests work. Aspen come first after fire to hold the earth together until pine can prosper and eventually take over. These stands of somewhat temporary trees are lovely reminders of my own temporal existence. I am here but for a season. What will I make of it?

s
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Just about a month ago, I got this fantastic new wallet from wildemoonleather. The design is simple and perfect for my needs. It neatly holds 4 or 5 cards and a few folded bills. And really, what else do you need? 

These kinds of simple and elegant designs are more than just supporting a small business and craftsperson. This wallet is the design equivalent of the tiny house movement. Why bother with something you don’t need (like three folds) when you can own something that is simple, made to last, and made by hand.

Go get one!

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